Article
The COVID-19 pandemic has hit most businesses very hard. Many industries have seen total shutdowns that lasted for as long as several months. Others, like many restaurants and retailers, have had to patch together short-term solutions, like curbside pickup, to minimize physical interactions. One market that’s set to boom, however, as businesses begin reopening, is commercial video conferencing, which allows important face-to-face meetings to continue happening, even as far as a continent or more away.

Videoconferencing Installations Set to Power Up

Chuck Ross
The COVID-19 pandemic has hit most businesses very hard. Many industries have seen total shutdowns that lasted for as long as several months. Others, like many restaurants and retailers, have had to patch together short-term solutions, like curbside pickup, to minimize physical interactions. One market that’s set to boom, however, as businesses begin reopening, is commercial video conferencing, which allows important face-to-face meetings to continue happening, even as far as a continent or more away.

Maybe like me, you’ve become accustomed to meeting with coworkers using basic solutions, like your laptop’s camera and microphone and software platforms like Zoom. However, for employees returning to their offices, as well as in settings like medical practices, laptop connections might not be stable or secure enough, or provide a large enough display, for daily use.

This is one reason why the San Francisco-based firm Grand View Research sees the video conferencing market – including hardware, software and services – growing by almost 10% a year between 2020 and 2027. For electrical contractors, that could mean new opportunities in installing monitors, speakers, cameras and other equipment.

But retrofitting video conferencing equipment into existing conference rooms, examination rooms or other locations can turn into a messy process. Unlike the laptop conferencing many of us have gotten used to in our homes, commercial-scale equipment generally doesn’t run on Wi-Fi. A hardwired connection is required to ensure connections have adequate bandwidth. This means, potentially, an AV controller, along with wiring and cabling for both power and data connections. The resulting rat’s nest of wiring and equipment could create an eyesore in an otherwise upscale corporate setting.

Fortunately, wall and ceiling boxes are available to create recessed housings for all the cabling and electronics no one wants to see. The wall boxes can be located directly behind flat panel displays (and “smart” whiteboards), allowing direct connections with no dangling wires. Similarly, ceiling boxes that blend into suspended ceiling systems for easy access to equipment and concealed, wired connections to ceiling mounted projectors and display devices.
Photo courtesy of Hubbell
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