Article
Crimping is an everyday chore for electrical contractors, but some might not understand the importance of the right tool for ensuring long-term durability and safety of electrical connections. There’s a lot more precision required to create a secure crimp than might appear on the surface, and the best results depend on using just the right pressure – not too little or too much – based on the job’s requirements.

Making Lasting Connections with the Right Crimping Tools

Chuck Ross
Crimping is an everyday chore for electrical contractors, but some might not understand the importance of the right tool for ensuring long-term durability and safety of electrical connections. There’s a lot more precision required to create a secure crimp than might appear on the surface, and the best results depend on using just the right pressure – not too little or too much – based on the job’s requirements.

Crimping and soldering are two of the primary methods for joining connectors to conductors. According to Kurt Schaefer, a senior product manager with Burndy Tools, a crimp offers significant advantages over a solder, when it comes to making an effective connection. “Crimp connections outperform soldering because material is displaced under high pressure during the crimping process, creating a more homogeneous cross section,” he says. “This results in a substantially stronger bond and minimizes electrical resistance. Crimping is an easier and faster process than soldering and, based on application, provides a more reliable connection.”

However, he adds, having the right equipment on hand is key to the crimping process. “Proper crimping requires a tool specifically designed to create a connection that will not pull apart and will allow electricity to easily pass from the conductor to the connector with limited resistance.”

The right match of crimping tool and die are critical to the success of a connection over time, says Mike Guarrera, also a Burndy Tools senior product manager. “Incorrect compression – over or under – can have a negative effect on both the electrical and mechanical properties of the connection,” he says. “This can lead to things such as overheating, mechanical failure and overall reliability issues of the connection.”
Photo courtesy of BURNDY
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