Article
While I don't normally refer to anything as a fitting when it comes to electrical cabling, I suppose the term, well, fits. If a device can be used to enhance the installation or protection of cables or conductors, it does "fit" the idea.

Cable Fittings and Electrical Cable Accessories

Steve Maurer, IME
While I don't normally refer to anything as a fitting when it comes to electrical cabling, I suppose the term, well, fits. If a device can be used to enhance the installation or protection of cables or conductors, it does "fit" the idea.

For example, strain reliefs installed in a conduit body could be considered a fitting of sorts. Often with a 50-pound pull rating, they keep the cable from pulling out of a tee, LB, or straight through, exposing the conductors to potential damage.

If you need more protection against pulling forces, consider using grips with flexible mesh cages. The harder the cable is pulled, the more the mesh grips the cable jacket. Several types of material are used. My favorites are made with stainless steel to protect against rust and corrosion.

Other fittings are designed to create a tap without cutting the conductor or cable. Insultation piercing taps penetrate the cable via teeth or barbs that make the connection when some form of compression is exerted. These are one way to make a branch off of a main circuit trunkline.

Of course, compression fittings or terminals are used to connect stranded wire more securely in cables to terminal blocks. They keep the little copper "hairs" from roaming about, causing potential short circuits and finger shocks. They make it easier to perform a clean, neat, and tidy install. (And they really help when troubleshooting, too.)

Pin adapters are often crimped on larger cables to ensure a tight connection. Set screws tend to flatten out the strands in a cable, and these pin adapters prevent possible hot spots. The pin provides a solid area to tighten the terminal block screw against.

And for flexible cables, this allows quick disconnection and reconnection when necessary.

While smaller terminals are compressed easily with hand tools, larger terminals, particularly those used on welding cables, forklift batteries, and similar applications benefit from powered crimping tools.

Similar in size and shape to a cordless drill, battery powered crimpers make the crimping task easier and more reliable. Whether they come with die sets or self-adjusting jaws, they are like the Cadillac of electrical tools when it comes to crimping terminals or pin adapters.

Power distribution blocks, mechanical terminals and splices, and split bolts round out our look at what could be called cable fittings. One thing to make note of is the rating on each, not just for size of cable, but type of alloy used in the conductors. Terminals and such are rated for either copper or aluminum because the dissimilar metals don't mix too good. But you can get fitting rated to accept both.
Photo courtesy of ILSCO
Galvanized Steel Cable Support
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