Keeping Wiring Connections Liquidtight

Electrical connections are vulnerable places for wiring. The transitions
 between conduit and equipment boxes need to address whatever risks the 
surrounding environment presents – including water, oil and corrosive 
chemicals – to maintain the integrity of internal wiring connections and
 reduce the possibility of short circuits and other electrical hazards. 
Liquidtight connectors address these challenges, in materials to suit 
any application’s needs. Arlington Industries

Chuck Ross

Electrical connections are vulnerable places for wiring. The transitions between conduit and equipment boxes need to address whatever risks the surrounding environment presents – including water, oil and corrosive chemicals – to maintain the integrity of internal wiring connections and reduce the possibility of short circuits and other electrical hazards. Liquidtight connectors address these challenges, in materials to suit any application’s needs.

Liquidtight fittings are especially important in industrial settings, and where full wash-down of equipment is a regular part of a facility’s operations. In such applications, vibration could loosen internal wiring connections, over time, and water, dust or gases could penetrate equipment boxes and pose risks of short circuits or explosions. Ensuring a seal between conduit and those boxes is a critical task for both specifiers and contractors.

Paired with flexible, nonmetallic Type B liquidtight conduit, these connectors come in a range of materials, both metallic and nonmetallic, with material choice generally following from the application’s specific demands. Metallic connectors can add strength in physically abusive environments, while nonmetallic products, including nylon offerings, can stand up better in corrosive settings.

Over the years, manufacturers have expanded their connector offerings to also make installation easier. Now contractors can choose from a number of liquidtight designs, including:
  • One-piece, screw-in options, with built-in gaskets, that take the place of multi-piece fittings that can be more time-consuming to install.
  • Connectors that simply snap onto conduit to create a liquid-tight seal.
  • Angled connectors to maintain a consistent arc in transitions requiring a wiring bend.


Photo courtesy of Arlington Industries

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