Cord Grips Give Power Cables Some Needed Support

While most of us are used to shin-high or lower electrical outlets, 
industrial plants often use ceiling- or wall-mounted buses for power 
distribution. These systems can keep power connections flexible as 
manufacturing floors are rearranged, but they also can add stress to 
power cables if their connection to an overhead outlet is the only thing
 holding them in place. Cord support grips address this problem by 
taking stress off the cable and helping to maximize uptime and minimize 
equipment damage. Hubbell Wiring Device-Kellems

Chuck Ross

While most of us are used to shin-high or lower electrical outlets, industrial plants often use ceiling- or wall-mounted buses for power distribution. These systems can keep power connections flexible as manufacturing floors are rearranged, but they also can add stress to power cables if their connection to an overhead outlet is the only thing holding them in place. Cord support grips address this problem by taking stress off the cable and helping to maximize uptime and minimize equipment damage.

Support grips bear the weight of a cord to minimize strain or possible pullout at an electrical connection, and they come in a range of sizes and materials to meet multiple needs. What they generally bear in common is a mesh body construction that is designed to contract with tension for greater support, along with an eye assembly that loops over a corresponding hook to provide needed cord support.

“They’re used wherever there’s a bend in the cable, so you can control the pullout and any strain,” explains Benny Thomas, product manager with Hubbell Wiring. Eye and body styles vary, but Thomas says one feature should be considered mandatory, regardless of other available options. “You want to have what we call strand equalizers to distribute the cord load all the way down the length of the grip.”

Support grips also are available in a number of materials to meet the challenges of a broad range of environmental hazards. Tin-coated bronze is the base-level choice, while stainless steel mesh offers greater corrosion resistance in severe-service settings. Aramid fiber – similar to military-grade Kevlar – is used in applications where even stainless steel won’t suffice.


Photo courtesy of Hubbell Wiring Device-Kellems

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