Smart Pull, Ergonomically Friendly Tools

Greenlee has introduced new contractor tools aimed at promoting and 
enhancing workplace safety and reducing on-the-job injuries. <br><br>First,
 earlier this year the company produced the Smart Pull, a device 
attached to cables as they are being pulled, which monitors stress on 
the cables in order to prevent snapping or damage to the wire. Greenlee

James R. Dukart

Greenlee has introduced new contractor tools aimed at promoting and enhancing workplace safety and reducing on-the-job injuries.

First, earlier this year the company produced the Smart Pull, a device attached to cables as they are being pulled, which monitors stress on the cables in order to prevent snapping or damage to the wire.

The Smart Pull wirelessly monitors speed, force and distance throughout a cable pull, and features a touch-screen LCD display that flashes early warning alerts when a cable shows too much stress or a pull is obstructed. The monitor also provides a data trail after the pull, so contractors can verify and produce accurate pull data (time, distance) for their clients.

Also working to make the electrical contractor workplace safer are new tools designed with ease of use, safety and comfort in mind. Jacob Thomas, an ergonomics specialist with Greenlee, points to new cable cutting, stripping and scoring tools that are designed to ease the stress on the shoulders, arms and backs of electrical contractor workers in the field.

Greenlee promotes its line of battery-powered crimpers and cutters as faster, safer and easier to use than traditional manual crimping tools. Created by the company’s Greenlee ErgoLab, the battery-powered tools, Greenlee says, are 90% faster than working with a knife and 70% faster than using a manual stripper. The new tools decrease the muscle effort needed to operate the tools and eliminate repetitive motion of the forearms, a leading cause of work-place injuries for electrical contractors, the company points out.

Thomas adds that all the new battery-powered tools feature hidden blades to eliminate one of the most common on-the-job injuries — lacerations of the hands and fingers while cutting and splicing cable.


Photo courtesy of Greenlee