Choosing Fasteners for Future Cabinet Upgrades

Manufacturing equipment is designed to last for decades, and the 
technology used to control those machines could evolve dramatically over
 that time. Electrical contractors can do their customers a big favor by
 organizing the cables going into equipment control panels so future 
upgrades are easy to complete. Fortunately, there is a broad range of 
fastening products available to bring organization to control cabinets, 
even in extreme conditions. HellermannTyton

Chuck Ross

Manufacturing equipment is designed to last for decades, and the technology used to control those machines could evolve dramatically over that time. Electrical contractors can do their customers a big favor by organizing the cables going into equipment control panels so future upgrades are easy to complete. Fortunately, there is a broad range of fastening products available to bring organization to control cabinets, even in extreme conditions.

Of course, cable ties are a key component in cable-organization efforts, and there are options to meet almost any application. Several styles are intended to make future modifications easier – and aid potential troubleshooting needs – by enabling the easy release and retying of bundled cables. In some cases, the head of the tie features a releasable closure that maintains its strength even after multiple openings and re-closings. Others feature an integrated hook-and-loop design that uses the weight of the bundle, itself, to maintain closure – contractors just need to lift up the end of the tie to disengage it.

Standoff ties are a newer option for panel assemblers and contractors working in tight spaces, according to Missy DeBord, product category manager with manufacturer HellermanTyton. These products make use of a gap some panel designs now incorporate between the back of the panel and the wall or column against which it is installed. The new design uses a fir-tree-style head that pops through panel knock-outs to hold the tie in place along the perimeter of the panel’s interior. This approach can free up more room for control electronics within a tightly packed panel.


Photo courtesy of HellermannTyton