Philips Lighting Reports LED Streetlights Cut Greenhouse Gases by 63%

Philips Lighting says cities around the world could cut CO2 emissions 
from street lighting by nearly two-thirds by switching to LED street 
lights.<br><br>In a report published in July in conjunction with the 
World Council on City Data (WCCD), the company said Los Angeles cut its 
greenhouse gas emissions from street lighting by 63% when it converted 
to connected LED street lighting in early 2016. Philips Lighting

James R. Dukart

Philips Lighting says cities around the world could cut CO2 emissions from street lighting by nearly two-thirds by switching to LED street lights.

In a report published in July in conjunction with the World Council on City Data (WCCD), the company said Los Angeles cut its greenhouse gas emissions from street lighting by 63% when it converted to connected LED street lighting in early 2016. In addition to cutting emissions, the report said the city has already seen or will soon see other benefits from LED use, such as crime reductions, improved traffic safety and economic growth.
 
The report said Los Angeles saw energy savings of approximately $9 million through its LED street lighting conversion, and reduced its annual greenhouse gas emissions associated with public lighting by 47,000 metric tons, the equivalent of greenhouse gas emissions from10,000 passenger vehicles driven for a year.

The City of Los Angeles integrated Philips Lighting’s CityTouch connected street lighting management system, integrating connected devices with web-based management applications including a remote lighting management tool to measure, manage and monitor connected street lights remotely through a real-time, map-based view. A lighting asset management application aids workflow management and maintenance planning. The city has now converted 140,000 street lights to LED and has 110,000 nodes connected and managed through the CityTouch system.

The report adds that better quality lighting could also bring reduced crime rates and improved citizen perceptions of safety. Los Angeles, the report said, has already seen a 10.5% drop in crime rates for offenses such as vehicle theft, burglary and vandalism in the first two years of its LED conversion program.
 
“City authorities face complex and challenging choices concerning infrastructure, balancing the need to maintain existing services while investing in improvements, managing population growth and enhancing sustainability – all within tight budget constraints,” said Harry Verhaar, Head of Global Public and Government Affairs, Philips Lighting.  
 
“The challenge is building the investment case to enable them to implement this technology in the first place,” Verhaar added.
 
Of approximately 300 million streetlights across the world, only about one in ten are energy-efficient LEDs, and just 2% are connected, Philips said.
 
Philips reported its findings to the United Nations in July, and called for a global switch to 100% LED street lighting by 2025, which the company says could reduce lighting’s share of global energy use near by half — from 15% to 8% worldwide.


Photo courtesy of Philips Lighting