Generators for Emergency Power in Home and Industry

Let’s face facts. Even though power technology is advancing, many of us,
 both in residential and commercial/industrial settings, have a problem.
 Our power grid is aging and deteriorating. Failures are common from 
both degradation and weather-related catastrophes. Generac

Steve Maurer, IME

Let’s face facts. Even though power technology is advancing, many of us, both in residential and commercial/industrial settings, have a problem. Our power grid is aging and deteriorating. Failures are common from both degradation and weather-related catastrophes.

For families, power failures aren’t just inconvenient. They can be life threatening. In-home medical equipment must be powered at all times. And, since the home-based business work force is expanding at record rate, the financial impact can be devastating.

For commercial and industrial businesses, “keeping the lights on” means more than just illumination. The food processing industry must keep refrigeration equipment running or risk major loss from spoilage. Other industries must maintain process control, not just for monetary reasons, but also for safety considerations.

Hospitals and emergency care facilities are also vulnerable to power outages. Loss of power could very well mean loss of life.

Technological advancement have change the way generator are both fueled and controlled. While diesel has long been the fuel of choice, natural gas, and bi-fuel (natural gas + diesel) options are available. Natural gas only options are available for residential installations as well as commercial/industrial applications.

Diesel has various constraints that natural gas and bi-fuel options overcome. These options make permitting and compliance easier. With little or no onsite fuel storage, complying with NEC 700 and NFPA 110 requirements is simplified.

Additionally, natural gas installations aren’t subject to road closures and delivery complications caused by weather and natural disaster-related catastrophes.

With electronics and digital advancements, precise control of power consumption is possible. And, with the development of IoT (Internet-of-Things), remote monitoring and control is simplified. The operation can be fine-tuned to current needs.

As businesses grow, so do their power requirements. While older systems were a challenge to upgrade, new gen sets are modular. This permits expansion of emergency power potential, both whenever and wherever needed.

Certainly, the state of today’s power grid demands that emergency power backup gets proper consideration, both on a residential and a business level. Protection for life, health and operational continuance are important for all of us.


Photo courtesy of Generac