Temporary Power – Lighting

If you've worked around any new construction or remodeling projects, 
you've used temporary lighting. You need to see adequately to get the 
job done properly. That's a given. When emergency repairs are performed,
 choosing the correct temporary light becomes crucial.<br><br>However, 
even though the lighting is temporary, it must be safe to use. And, yes,
 OSHA has regulations concerning the use of temporary lighting, right 
down to its construction. Molex

Steve Maurer, IME

If you've worked around any new construction or remodeling projects, you've used temporary lighting. You need to see adequately to get the job done properly. That's a given. When emergency repairs are performed, choosing the correct temporary light becomes crucial.

However, even though the lighting is temporary, it must be safe to use. And, yes, OSHA has regulations concerning the use of temporary lighting, right down to its construction.

They type of lighting you use depends, in a large part, to the environment you're working in at the time. If there are special hazards or safety concerns, the lighting equipment must address those concerns. Sorry... there really isn't a one-size-fits-all solution.

For example, if working in hazardous locations, the fixture's construction becomes extremely important. Working around flammable or potentially explosive atmospheres demands that the portable fixture and light source will not become an ignition source.

If there is a potential for a lamp to break, exposing the filaments, then the bulb itself must be contained in an additional housing.

Most of the time, however, a temporary lighting fixture is designed to be damage resistant in normal atmospheres. Guards protect the bulb from impact damage.

According to OSHA regulations, the cord itself must be designed to withstand the rigors of wear, tear, and other damage. That often means a heavy-duty, cut resistant jacket that is molded to the fixture.

Temporary lighting choices are available for closeup work and for wide area lighting. Of course, the selection also depends on whether the workers are in a dry or wet location.

Portable handheld fixtures and stationary, mounted lighting come in a variety of lamp and voltage options. You can buy temporary lighting with an included transformer that steps the voltage down from 120 VAC to 12 volts.

Lamp choices can be incandescent, fluorescent, and, more recently, LEDs. Ranging from hanging HID fixtures to tube lights to hand held "trouble lights," the options are varied. This allows you to match the lighting to the task at hand.

Just be sure to consult OSHA guidelines when choosing and using any form of temporary lighting.


Photo courtesy of Molex